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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
're not just a bureaucratic agency. we have sensitivity. we have people who work for us who are supposed to be there helping protect these people. it really broke through new ground for us. >> let's take another question -- it is great to have these kind of specifics. go ahead and identify yourself -- >> i am an international baccalaureate. thank you for your comments and you have a lot of wisdom and forgiving as a glimpse into the human side of things. with as many women who have reached panicles of their career and for those like yourself, is there a new path beyond that? once you reach the pinnacle, what can we expect to see of women who have accomplished a lot? do you retire into personal life or is that there are some other pathway once they leave their position? >> what are you going to do next? >> the women i have come across have -- who have also reached those high platitudes, they continue to be active, for the most part. i think this new environment, be it political or social environment has changed. people want to do more. sometimes people will do it as volunteers. want to be
>> you don't know us investigating reporting. the point we've seen over the years is not just economics. it's was caused administering because it's troublesome. ..'s watch live sunday january 6th at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> coming up booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we interview authors. acclaimed inventor ray kurzweil and his latest book, how to create a mind:an exploration of reverse engineering of the brain. the national medal of technology recipient attempts to determine how the brain works and apply the knowledge to the creation of intelligent michelin's. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,achines . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, ingrid wickelgren. >> this is a fascinating book and it is great to be with you. my first question is to try to talk about the main thesis of the book. are you saying that we can basically reverse engi
: that's it for tonight's willis report. thanks for joining us, i hope you and your families all have a safe and a very, very merry lou: there is the least three doubles and lawsuits, however, challenging obamacare, including the requirement that workplace health plans cover birth control. pennsylvania, the latest to announce it will not have the obamacare insurance exchange, becoming the 22nd state to set up the exchange, leaving it up to the federal government government to implement exchanges. the president's health care law was so unpopular when the president signed it into law and it remains absolutely that two years later. apparently nancy pelosi was right about the obamacare program, at least when she uttered these now infamous words, calling for passage of the legislation. >> we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it. away from the father of the controversy. lou: is getting rid of obamacare so one option for republicans? we will talk with legal analyst peter johnson on the way forward. also, the worsening political crisis in egypt. splitting egypt between
. >> thanks for waking up with us, god bless and merry christmas. >> merry christmas. >> good morning, everyone. i have the biggest smile on my nice because it's december 25th. merry christmas to all all viewers across the country, around the world and to our servicemen and women keeping us safe overseas today and their families. i want to show you a live look of presiden bethlehem, we'll be back there in a moment. i'm jaime colby. >> i'm kelly wright, we are glad your here. >> we have a very important show ahead. fox news alert in upstate new york as authorities piece together what led to a gunman opening fire yesterday on christmas eve at four firefighters ballistic link and i tense inferno. police say the gunman set his house on fire to lure the first responders, then proceeded to ambush them, killing two and occurring two others. the gunman dent find as an ex-con then willed himself. police have the gruesome task of looking for more victims in the charred ruins. >> the fire has it under control. there are seven houses totally distrade at the scene. there is still an active crime s
at the highest level of educating the visitors and others to use public transportation. it will work for all of us and as we build the housing units we identified in hunter's point and treasure island and welcome more people to our great city and we are growing as a result. we are going to have the greatest subway system that can connect to our bart, to our caltrans, to up and down our muni lines. this central subway will be a great success. it will connect to some of the most densely populated and rapidly developing areas, and it will improve access to all of our vibrant communities, and really is investments like this that will foster loyalty among all of our public transit customers while we reduce carbon emissions, make our city cleaner and cleaner. i'm not the only one that thinks this way. you know i'm among many, many friends today in the audience, on stage and i would like to invite at this time someone who has made it a practice to visit our city regularly, to make sure this project was being planned well, that the initial funds that were granted to us by president obama and with
on to a better place. we have won't forget them. we want to say thank you for joining us "the five" today. thank you for watching. we want to wish you all a very merry christmas. and merry christmas to the troops as well. have a great night, everyone. >> bob: merry christmas. ♪ ♪ >> doug: chilling details just revealed in the christmas eve ambush that left two volunteer firefighters dead. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> doug: good evening. i'm doug mckelway in for bret baier. policemen are piecing together what led a gunman to set his home on fire to lure the first responders. he killed two of them and injured two others. correspondent david lee miller is live with breaking details including news the shooter left a note. good evening, david. >> reporter: doug, up until now there was only speculation to what the gunman william spangler was thinking when he took the lives of two firefighters and injuring two others. now we know the evil intent was to cause as much carnage as possible. when volunteer firefighters arrived at the home of spangler, they didn't know they would be ambus
prompted the obama administraon say, well, republicans don't want to protect us. how are you going to answer the predictable criticism that you're not looking out for folks, you are looking out for business interests? >> well, we are. we are saying in health emergency, of course. any sensible policymaker would say you have to be able to address those. but right now, the pendulum has swung so far that it's very difficult to even conceive starting up your business. and we want that to occur again. much less allowing for those who are operating businesses to keep the lights on and grow. you know, you look at the last three years. we have seen a 23% decline in the number of business startups. in america, we are a starter country and we want to see it happen again. neil: he was ronald reagan's top money guy. why he says capitalism is in trouble these days and it's the governments fault. by the way, republicans as well. we have david stockman acts. and suzanne somers on lala land going gaga over presiden obama. but next, ralph nader has had enough. he says that both parties in washington
. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll nominate? caller: obama. host: what makes him your hero? caller: we were on a major slide when he came into office. he save the automobile and got osama bin laden. he did everything even though the gop
important lasting legacies of the past presidents. joining us at the table, executive editor at random house and pliltser prize-winning historian john meacham, best-selling presidential historian doris kearns goodwin, and ferris professor at princeton university and author about president eisenhower evan thomas. >> what a great way to start it because dwight eisenhower, you always see presidents rise, you see presidents fall, and over the past four, five, six seven years i have found myself going back and reading ambrose's "eisenhower" over and over again. talk about -- let's start with eisenhower right now, my favorite president. it may change after i read your biography. >> exactly. or after we hear from meacham. >> or hear that he would kick dogs instead of go golf. but talk about eisenhower derided as dull and worthless and now we look back and say, my god, what he did over eight years pretty unbelievable. >> one of the great shots of all time was the kennedys on eisenhower. to make jack kennedy look young and vibrant, you had to make eisenhower look old and dull. that stuck. but what pe
a few hours ago. janine de la vega is on the scene and joins us from campbell. how does it look out there, janine? >> reporter: well, the fire is out here at this commercial building on del avenue. firefighters are still putting water on it. you can actually see the smoke still rising in the air coming from that building. now, originally we were told that the firefighters had not entered the building yet for safety precautions. let's go to some video. here you can see some flames shooting from the roof. we were told they were 50 feet up in the air at one point. firefighters were called to the scene just before 5:00 a.m. they immediately started to attack it from the outside. the fire then grew to three alarms. firefighters put up three aerial ladders to spray on the scene. >> we can see there's an engineering. in the back is where the fire was at. we're not sure what is inside, what type of businesses. >> reporter: one of the businesses is called mccalman engineering. the other we're told is a startup tech firm. it's unclear the extent of the damage. but in the last few minutes, i d
and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around the world have taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship would have -- it was the invention of steam power but the creation of regimented european empires around the globe, the opening of the suez canal and the emergence of commercial travel services that together made it just possible by the 18 70's t
maw maw started to annoy us, we got a little more creative with our solutions. (plays classical music) things around the house actually got a little more peaceful and on those rare occasions where we had to bring out the big guns, well, sometimes that's just what family has to do. your damn pet monkey stole the last piece of taffy. (maw maw grunting) and nothing says family like squirting your 86-year-old grandmother in the face so she won't hit your granddaughter with a fireplace poker. tune in next week for the exciting conclusion. (laughs) just kidding. no, you can't stretch this crap into a three-parter. captioning sponsored by 20th television and brought to you by volkswagen. >>> the storm may be over but the problems remain and tonight the repairs are just beginning in the areas hardest hit by a powerful weekend weather system. good evening i'm ken pritchett. >> and i'm jana katsuyama. frank and julyly have the night off. beyond the area people have been cleaning up from the weekends storms. and there's more rain headed our way. chief meteorologist bill martin has rain totals an
keilar joins us live from honolulu, hawaii. so a slight bit of news. do tell. >> reporter: i hesitate to even say it's a slight bit of news because it's sort of exactly what we would expect, to be honest. the white house is talking about senate democrats about what senate majority leader harry reid will have to cobble together when the senate reconvenes on the 27th and that's really the last-ditch effort. it's seen as the senate trying to do something that can also pass the house, so this is exactly what you would expect. the real problem though is as of this morning, just a week out from when the fiscal cliff is expected to hit. there's no discussions between congressional democrats and congressional republicans even on the staff level. this is what democratic and republican sources are telling me, and overall just to remind people, instead of this being -- here's what we expect. instead of this being some big bill to try to deal with the long-term fiscal health of the country which is what the fiscal cliff was supposed to be an incentive to do, we're expecting now that this is just
insurance. >> if it does we'll just have to take off and leave again. we can't stay, we have to use common sense. >> reporter: earlier today we spoke to the executive director of joint powers authority. the regional agency made up of three cities and two counties takes care of flood control issues. >> the joint power authority has approved a project that will rebuild the whole levy system. >> reporter: it was easy to see where creek water boiled up on the other side pushing water into the neighborhood. east palo alto's new city manager said with more rain on the way crews needed to shore up and put sandbags down. >> we expect that this will keep us through that time, this will work through this spring. hopefully no rain and no major rains between now and then after that and then they'll start the work in the fall. >> reporter: pamela says that the first flood coincided with her first bout of cancer. >> as long as we're alive and we have something to eat, we're cool. too late to move now. >>> the bryant family who lives here in east palo alto their home also flooded and they shared these ph
the president took office. i just think it's time for us to stop talking about making it harder to create jobs and instead, say we champion small business and we want you to grow and expand and give us a great economy by hiring people. gerri: senator, i like what you said about stability and predictability. i think that's what a lot of people are looking for out there. thanks for coming on the show. great to have you here. i hope you come back soon. >> thanks, gerri. i love being on. thank you. gerri: thank you. a federal tax credit for wind power producers expires in 2013. the obama administration is pushing for new taxpayer support for wind projects. with our budget deficit soaring an intense debate is heating up over whether the government should be throwing your tax dollars at industry the first place. i asked robert bryce, senior fellow at the manhattan institute about this issue. let's start with the tax credit. >> sure. gerri: this is industry, let's face it they don't have a whole lot to show for themselves yet we subsidize them to the tune of $1.2 billion. why? >> remember the industr
us back to your house. make sure to tune in washington, good night. merry christmas. >> they were responding to a fire when somebody started shooting at them. >> upon arrival of the first two engine company and some firefighters in their personal vehicles, they underwent gunfire from the location unknown. >> tonight, firefighters gunned down in the street and why police say it looks like this was a trap. mexican police locked up this former marine over the summer on gun charges. now he has made it home just in time for christmas. >> while i was sleeping johnny got up in the morning and walked to the beach and watched the sun come up. >> jamie: tonight, the reunion that's been months in the making. and christmas at the vatican. >> jamie: we will take to you rome, to bethlehem and to afghanistan for a look at how folks are celebrating. ♪ heaven and nature sing. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby in tonight for shepard smith. we begin tonight with the apparent ambush that has literally stunned a small town in upstate new york this christmas eve. volunteer firefighters had just arrived at th
. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, including one in western new york, where an attacker lay in wait for a fire crew. >> responding firefighters when they pulled up on the scene started receiving -- were fired upon. >> police speaking shortly after a home and car erupted in flames. it was arson they said later that turned out to be an ambush. >> it does appear that it was a trap that was set. for responding first responders. >> gunmen killed two volunteer firefighters and wounded two others then killed himself. police identified him as william sp
? thank you. you do look familiar. where did i see you before? u.s. they good question, did you not? -- you asked a good question, did you not? what is your name again? >> danielle. >> you are old hat here. you do this all of the time. good to see you. have fun. >> have fun, hey. show me what we are doing. what kind of lollipops are these? is this white house honey? do you know these come from bees we keep in the backyard? why? they make fresh honey, and the health the garden grove. -- they help the garden grow. >> this is good. >> did you taste these? this is good. [laughter] these are really good. ?id you put sugar on these ne how do you get it curly? >> they turned out really cute, and it is a good crunch. we should give some of the photographers some of these to see how good they taste. those are so good. healthy, tasty expects. not bad. -- snacks. not bad. ok. now we desperate. i have to figure out what design. -- now we have to decorate. now i have to figure out what design. decisions, decisions. ok. >> this is all edible, ok, guys? >> once you put this on, you can eat this lo
have always carried a little recording device of some sort. they used to be pretty big, but now they are quite small, and i always carry a pen and paper, and i am ready if something occurs to me. >> you mentioned merle travis. what other musicians? >> ry cooder is my favorite guitar player, but there are many others to choose from. there was an album that was a formative for me. "paradise and lunch." there was a guy coming up called tom rush who played here at the cellar door, and he played in boston at the 47. i really pattern myself after, just a guy with a guitar, full position, unapologetic. -- falcon musician. unapologetic folk musician. and i would say wouldtwo and the beatles. >> what do you think of current pop music? >> you know, i guess i do not like it a whole lot. [laughter] [applause] >> i guess i don't like it a whole lot. >> what would we find -- >> i sound just like my dad. there are great people out there, i know it. and i don't mean to condemn it but i think it's passed me by a little bit. i still have a wonderful career and a beautiful audience that i really l
to this story. >> what was amazing to us and what was relevant is the idea that nowhere on american television had a returning soldier returning from war been portrayed. and obviously in very circumstances in the case of our character, but that was something that really interested us but it felt like a good way to dramatize a lot of the questions we answered on "24" in a more knew answer fashion ten years after 9/11. a lot of questions that weren't clear then are even more complex now. what do we have to be afraid of? what's the price of our security? and these are the characters we created to ask those questions. >> and michael, with "the queen" what prompted that? decpwhrit came from another deal. it was a trilogy of films. the deal was a film made for british television about the supposed deal that was made between tony blair and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of
of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killing 27 people including the country's head of border security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a southern city. the dead also included seven crew members and 19 border guards. there was no immediate word on the cause of the crash but kazakhstan has been plagued by heavy winds and snow in recent weeks. the long-time actor charles durning died monday at his home in new york. he came to be known as the king of character actors. in a 50-year career that spanned broadway, the movies and television. along the way he earned two oscar nominations. one was for his role as the corrupt governor in the best little whorehouse in texas in 1992. in tootsies he played the suitor of dustin hoffman who was posing as a female soap opera star. now back to gwen. >> ifill: we turn to politics and part 2 of our lookality upcoming elections. last n
with us. hope everyone is having a wonderful holiday. >> i want them to spend the entire morning. >> are you having a wonderful holiday? >> of course! i'm here, aren't i? i love it! i love it! >> we can't stay awake. >> i've got my 4-year-old, jack, right over. he's working the must-read opinion pages. he's getting them all together. little kate somewhere in the back. >> she's rolling prompter. >> actually, i'm having her take me bar belbells down to the off on the second floor. and joey and andrew are over there somewhere. we're having a great holiday season. >> this hour, we're taking a look back at the stories that shaped the year 2012. joining us on set are msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. hello, mike. >> hello, mika. >> yeah. good thing you're awake. national affairs editor for "new york" magazine and msnbc political analyst, john heilemann. >> hi! >> yeah. hi. and from cnbc headquarters, co-host of cnbc's "squawk box," andrew ross sorkin. >> do i need to make a joke about school being out? >> that's so yesterday. we're tired of that, actually. >> you like kind of grown. >>
. tell us what how they locked horns other this. >> well, it would have to be one of the oldest debate thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't
those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption. but america forgets quickly and gives no lasting indication it seems redemption from its fetish with guns, its romance with the free market of violence, with the sport of it all. the show must go on. it's our right. at any price. what were eir nes again? oh, yes. charlotte, daniel, olivia, daniel, allison, dawn. poor things. such a tragedy. praise the lord and pass the ammunition. so we make our peace with violence and make ourselves over in its image. a state senator in missouri, a lifetime member of the national rifle association, is pushing a bill to require that all first graders be enrolled in the nra's gun s
said he is, the son of god, but we welcome all people of all persuasions and we say check us out. when jesus went out and started his ministry, the first phrase he said, he's walking along the jordan river and john the baptist had a couple guys following him, and he said, there goes the lamb of god. go follow him. and andrew and john said, where are you going, lord. and here are jesus' first words, come and see. that's about as low a commitment as you can ask, just check us out. we say you don't have to say anything, sign anything, sacrifice anything, just check us out. >> america is going through a slight down draw, if you like, in attendance in churches. 1 in 5 are now religiously unaffiliated. 1 in 3 under 30 are religiously unaffiliated. a more worrying statistic i would think. still way ahead of other countries. now, britain, for example, far worse statistics than that. so america remains a very religious country, but why do you think it's on decline? >> there are three different factors. one factor is the actual number of atheists in the country has remained the same since 1950,
guests we have with us. i would like to begin with a welcome to one of our members of board of trustees and the former governor of the state of california pete wilson. governor. [applause] [applause] our county supervisor peter floyd. peter, thank you for coming. [applause] now for those of who who were patient enough to go through the book signing line prior to the event this evening we yo know the wonderful woman is here with us tonight. she's "the new york times" best selling officer and president of gingrich productions. please join me in recognizing calista fig h -- gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a special guest. if i i know if i were simply to give the typical dinner circuit gingrich the one where you list every accomplishment of the speaker's bio. i promise you we would be here all night and newt would get bored. the list of achievements in politics, his involvement in life-long learning, his expertise of national security matters, his best interest, the philanthropy endeavors. the box he's written, the list goes on and on. let's presume we are well accounted with t
. then sam jackson's character comes in and using torture and the whole film is about me being tortured by sam jackson and pushing you to see how far everybody concerned is prepared to go to get the information out of him. it was an incredibly difficult film to make for me. i remember one of the first days of the torture thing which is is something where i was chained to the ceiling and hosed down with water with fans blowing on me. and i said how are we going to do this and they said we're going to do it but not for very long. that set up a precedent for the hole film. that was a very frightening thing to go through. a point you brought up which is the idea that people's desire to be involved in helping the imaging of this completely depends on what they believe is how they are being portrayed in it. and that gets very complicated. >> it's a public they report they are trying to not to get in trouble. there are agencies who are better or less. >> i think mueller believed in the idea which he sort of watched the c.s.i. effect. c.s.i. created more interest in people going into coronaries
and has put these bombs around the place. then sam jackson's character comes in and using torture and the whole film is about me being tortured by sam jackson and pushing you to see how far everybody concerned is prepared to go to get the information out of him. it was an incredibly difficult film to make for me. i remember one of the first days of the torture thing which is is something where i was chained to the ceiling and hosed down with water with fans blowing on me. and i said how are we going to do this and they said we're going to do it but not for very long. that set up a precedent for the hole film. that was a very frightening thing to go through. a point you brought up which is the idea that people's desire to be involved in helping the imaging of this completely depends on what they believe is how they are being portrayed in it. and that gets very complicated. >> it's a public they report they are trying to not to get in trouble. there are agencies who are better or less. >> i think mueller believed in the idea which he sort of watched the c.s.i. effect. c.s.i. created
us. and i wanted to congratulate you on your national press award. this is the third time you won it. congratulations. >> i'm alina cho. i'll be back. >>> you know, dana bash is the -- she's good on capitol hill. good morning and merry christmas. >>> stories we're watching in the newsroom on this christmas day. pope benedict xvi tells people not to up hope even in the world's most troubled reasons. his appeal for peace. >>> and it's not the grinch stealing christmas cheer. it's the weather. blizzard warnings may turn your white christmas into a travel nightmare. and tornados threaten the south. your forecast is coming up. >>> and we're seven days away from going off the fiscal cliff and with washington in a political gridlock we're getting closer and closer. the question, how will it affect you and your paycheck? >>> the images, the words, the names, highlights and low lights of 2012. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning to you. i'm carol costello wishing you and yours a merry christmas and we begin with pope benedict xvi using his an i'll christmas message to speak about the h
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)